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Avoid These 3 Common Mistakes for Painting Around Pets

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3 common mistakes for painting around pets

You may or may not know that we have been very busy with a move this summer. The move is to a cooler climate, one that even offers seasons, but there was a lot of repair work that needed to be done to make the area comfortable for our pets.

One thing we always have to consider is how these changes impact our pets. Construction isn’t fun for anyone, least of all, our pets.

Consequently, when we choose to decorate, we needed to take precautions that prevent harm or stress to pets. Painting proved to be the most challenging.

In the event you haven’t done it in awhile, pets can be particularly troublesome to paint around. They have no concept of what paint is and think your attention to the walls is a new form of play. While some of the behavior might be amusing and frivolous fun, you may not enjoy the consequences should you fail to take precautions.

Here we explore three common mistakes when painting around pets.

3 common mistakes for painting around pets

Believing you can tell them to keep off the wet paint and they will listen.

Even humans, with all the power to read a wet paint sign, have the capacity to lean or brush against painted surfaces. The comedy image of the man who sits on a painted bench and stands with a striped backside is funny because we have all got close to doing the same.

Imagine then if you are a four-legged friend, whether dog or cat, and you are told firmly to stay away from the walls and the woodwork.In most cases, they will almost purposefully lean against the wall as you’re telling them to stay away.

While the hair and paint mix is not great for the final finish, the paws in spilled paint that then travel over your expensive rugs or flooring is even worse. I won’t even go into tail splatter from paint that cats are so well known for.

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For long-haired cats and dogs, the paint will cause some troublesome fur matting that could end up being painful and difficult for you to remove. You may end up with a groomer’s bill (or worse, a veterinary bill) on top of the construction costs.

Keeping potential disasters in mind, you have a few options.

  • If the weather is warm enough, then it might be that your garden is the safest place for your pets. If you don’t have fencing yet, consider some temporary fencing that is affordable and easy to install for short times of confinement. Remember to place the structure in an area that has plenty of shade and check on your pets often.
  • If the yard isn’t possible, you might want to consider a pet sitter or asking a friend to look after them while the work is done.
  • Think of ways to speed up the process, such as hiring professionals, using a spray paint gun, or one coat paint.

Believing that there is no harm to the pets in being around paint

Paint fumes are no better for animals than they are for humans. If your pets absolutely have to be around you as you work, you need to keep the room well-ventilated.

However, the biggest safety issue comes from working around you when you are focused on your task and moving up and down ladders.

The chance that you will inadvertently step back on your animals or drop something is very high. Your dogs especially see you as part of the pack and want to be part of any activities you’re engaged in – including construction and painting. They are more likely to see it as a time of play more than anything, which just increases the chance of an accident and an injury.

It is not just the huge veterinary bill that should deter you here. You would be devastated if something was to happen to your best friend. You are essentially turning your home into a workshop, and health and safety issues change. Embrace the rules of construction and operate on the idea of safety first.

Letting them into the area too soon

As humans, we can keep ourselves from brushing against walls and the like until the paint is thoroughly dry. As we established, pets can’t read and have no concept of what tacky paint means.

Putting the room back together and enjoying the space before everything is thoroughly dry could lead to several problems. Most notably, you will be looking at a lot of hair stuck into your walls and other surfaces, ruining that perfect finish.

When you recoat, you will likely need to wait 24 hours before painting again. While two hours is long enough for the paint to feel touch dry, it will still be slightly tacky (making it a magnet for pet hair). This is why it’s best to keep them away from the area for at least 24 hours.

While most of this is common sense, it is easy to forget some of the basics when you are focused on redecorating an area. The best course of action is to get your pets out of the home for a day or two.

There are many options for doing this without stressing your dog or cat out:

  • Doggy Daycare: Daycare is a great option for dogs who just need to be out of the house for a day. They have a good time, you get your work done, and you don’t have to keep them busy when they arrive home because they are usually exhausted!
  • Boarding: Another option is to board them for a day or two while you complete your work. This may not be as fun for your pets, but if you choose a great boarding facility, they will be much happier for missing the remodel experience.
  • Leave with Friends or Neighbors: A simple change of scenery is also a great option. Leaving them with someone you trust for a few hours will give you time to complete the project without worrying about tripping over your curious cat or demanding dog.

When your pets return to the newly remodeled area, they will be happy and hopefully as tired as you are! Make sure you give them plenty of time to adjust. They will want to sniff around, examine the new layout, and explore different areas. This is a good thing and should be encouraged!

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