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Wildlife News & Stories | PetsWeekly

Out of Africa, Into Eden

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The 500-pound cat lazes in the afternoon heat, his two best tiger friends resting nearby. I approach with measured steps, the beast’s amber eyes following every movement through half-closed lids. At this distance, I'm not a threat, but one step in the wrong direction and I make the transformation from interested observer to trespasser. I measure the distance between us, deciding if it's worth it... Let’s face it - there’s something magical about wildlife. It’s a quality that can’t be described without using words like mystical and reverent. This is especially true when it comes to big cats.  And that’s why I’m breaking from our normal “pet talk” tradition to discuss a wildlife park called Out of Africa. We all have a fascination with wildlife. If you don’t, you probably aren’t reading this (but maybe you should be). If you do, you know what I’m talking about. Wildlife parks and zoos are critical to preserving wildlife. Because let’s face it – if you never actually see wildlife, it’s harder to care about its outcome. This is doubly true for our youth. Wildlife parks and zoos provide the perfect opportunity for educating the public on animals.

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Wolf Awareness Week

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Did You Know: You stand a better chance of getting hit by a meteorite than being killed by a wolf.

Although wolves are large, powerful animals that could kill humans, they don't. According to a 2002 study about wolf conflicts with humans, there is no documented case of a healthy, wild wolf killing a human in the United States. By comparison, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate between 10 to 20 people are killed and 4.7 million attacked each year by man's best friend, the domestic dog.

Well folks, the third week of October is the official Wolf Awareness week. This means that if you're a parent, an educator, or just someone who cares about wildlife, you can take this opportunity to educate yourself and others on the importance of helping wolves survive. We are here to provide some great references on wolves and we hope you'll take a moment to read them through.

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Wyoming Makes Mountain Lions the Scapegoats Again!

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Tomorrow is the final day the Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD) is accepting written comments on their proposed 2010-11 Mountain Lion Hunting Regulations. Unfortunately, the new regulations are a misguided attempt to placate a small, but vocal, special interest group (deer hunters), and have no chance of achieving their attended goal. It appears that, like in most of the western states, Wyoming's mule deer herd was significantly larger twenty years ago. Human obstruction in historic migratory deer routes, a severe multiyear drought, radical changes to deer habitat vegetation, and excessive periods of over-hunting have all done their part in reducing many of the regional mule deer populations to half of what they were in 1992.

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Wolf found shot to death in AZ

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mexican-wolf-azThe body of a Mexican wolf was found shot to death on June 18 in Eastern Arizona. Authorities are investigating the death, but US Fish and Wildlife officials state the wolf was killed by gunshot wound. The Wildlife Service is offering a reward of up to $10,000 for information leading to the arrest of whoever is responsible. The wolf was an Alpha male from the Hawks Nest Pack, which traditionally uses an area east of Big Lake in the Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest. The pack is one of the first packs released in Arizona over the past several years. Mexican wolves are the smallest and most endangered subspecies of North American gray wolves. Commonly referred to as "El lobo," the Mexican wolf is usually gray with light brown fur on its back. Its long legs and sleek body enable it to move quickly through desert landscapes.

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Suspect in AZ Jaguar B incident pleads guilty to endangered species violatio

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Emil McCain, 31, of Patagonia, the individual involved in the Macho B incident last year, pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court on Friday, May 14 for unlawfully taking a jaguar, an endangered species, in violation of the U.S. Endangered Species Act. McCain was sentenced by U. S. Magistrate Judge Bernardo P. Velasco to five years of supervised probation with the condition that he is not permitted to be employed or any way involved in any large cat or large carnivore project or study in the United States during his probationary term. McCain was also fined $1,000 for the Class A misdemeanor conviction. Court documents provide the following facts describing McCain’s connection to the conduct for which he pleaded guilty:

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