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  • Behavior Problems? We have answers.

    Learn about behavior from our team of experts. Whether you have cats, dogs, reptiles, horses or birds, we can help you learn to live with them. Read More
  • All About Horses

    Learn about equine science, whether you're an aspiring rider or a long-time owner, we have the latest in products, breeds, and more. Read More
  • Traveling with Pets

    Be sure to check this section out before you hit the road with your pet! We've got a look at pet-friendly hotels, the guidelines of air, train, bus and auto travel, and much more. Read More
  • All About Critters

    Take a look at what it means to have ferrets, rabbits, mice, rats, guinea pigs, and more. Read More
  • All About Reptiles

    A look at our cold-blooded friends and discovering how to care for these fun loving creatures! Read More
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  • Dog Etiquette: Leashes

    Recently, we posted on Facebook that we were out walking our dogs and experienced two small, off-leash dogs aggressively running to our much larger, leashed dogs. My dogs were both on-leash and controlled, but I was still annoyed. After posting my experience, I received a lot of responses - some of which were a bit negative due to the fact that one of my dogs looks like a pit bull (apparently I shouldn't be walking him?). Here’s the thing: It doesn’t matter if my dogs are pit bulls or chihuahuas or golden retrievers. In fact, I could have been walking alone, or riding a horse, or walking my cat. The fact is, dogs of any size should never run up on another person or animal without being invited to do so. It’s a common courtesy that could save your dog’s life.

    Here are just a few reasons why...

    Read More
  • 10 Possible Reasons Your Cat Is Behaving Badly

    If your healthy cat is suddenly peeing on your bed or spraying in your office, if he's taken to running around at strange hours of the night, or mewing inconsolably all night, there are several possible explanations. Of course, you must always take them in for a vet check to eliminate any possible health conditions like blockages or disease. But health problems have been eliminated and your cat is still acting out inappropriately, here are some possible explanations.

    Room Deodorizers

    Everyone has probably used a room deodorizer in their home, particularly if they have cats. One of the most common places to put diffusers and other such items are near the litter-box. Avoid doing this! It can cause undue stress on  your cats and even make it difficult for them to use the litter box.

    Solve This: Instead of placing a deodorizer or diffuser near your cat's box, try one of the helpful Litter Box Deodorizers on the market. You can also tape live charcoal on the side or the bottom of the box or sprinkle the box with baking soda prior to putting cat litter inside.

    Read More
  • Winter Caretaking of Feral Cats

    We have long been supporters of feral cats and advocate the use of Trap, Neuter & Release (TNR) as a form of managing feral cat colonies. Caretakers who support these animals are a special breed as they are able to care for an animal that is unable to care back – as far as we’re concerned, that’s the truest type of love.

    It makes us very happy when we can introduce new products designed specifically to keep feral cats safe and warm, while making the caretakers job a little bit easier. Today I want to show off a specialty feral cat house and a feral cat feeder that is available for purchase. While it is entirely possible to make a feral cat shelter and feeding platform, we know that many people would prefer to buy one ready-made and Feline Furniture is our “go to” group for these products.

    Read More
  • Fencing Solutions to Keep Dogs Contained

    If you have a dog, you know how difficult it can be to keep them on your property. Sometimes dogs just want to escape the confines of their yard, but it's our responsibility as guardians to ensure our pets are within our control at all times - even those times we're not physically with them. Fences make for good neighbors, and they make much safer environments for pets. Here are five ways you can fence your yard and the costs, the benefits and the dangers of each.

    The type of fencing you ultimately select should be based on your geographical region, your HOA guidelines (if you have them), and the type of dog(s) you are containing. You'll also need to consider your weather. If you're in an area with lots of weather, you'll want to consider installing a more durable type of fencing. If you live in an area with snow, the snow can pile up near the gates and provide a near perfect way for your pets to escape. But, if you have a dog that is regularly escaping from your yard, consider reading this article or implementing some of these practical tips below:

    Read More
  • Keeping Pets Safe from Coyotes

    No matter where you live, you’ve likely had to deal with wildlife. Whether its mountain lions and coyotes, or squirrels and deer, we live in a world with a rapidly increasing human population –  which means we are continually infringing on wildlife. The more we infringe on their territory, take their water supply and diminish their prey, the more they will be forced to enter our domestic havens. And whether you like it or not, coyotes are a very important part of nature’s balance.

    The one question we get most frequently is how to deal with wild animals that enter our yards threaten our dogs and cats. We are very strong believers in maintaining a symbiotic relationship with nature, so it’s important to us that we raise awareness on the issue. This week, we are discussing how you can keep your pets safe from coyotes and we’re including a whole section on how to do this in step-by-step format...

    Read More
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5 Questions to Ask Before Getting Chickens

There is a lot of interest in chicken keeping these days. With the cost of food skyrocketing, chickens can be Read More

Keeping Pets Safe from Coyotes

No matter where you live, you’ve likely had to deal with wildlife. Whether its mountain lions and coyotes, or squirrels Read More

5 Ways to Help Birds in Winter on #NationalBirdDay

January 5 is officially National Bird Day and we're looking at ways that we can help our feathered friends during Read More

Getting Old Sucks - Cognitive Dysfuntion in Dogs (CCD)

As most of you know, we have a dog who has just turned 15 years old. He’s half blind, almost Read More

Teaching Children to Approach Horses

I have a problem with parents who just allow their kids just run up to strange animals. In fact today, Read More

Tapeworms are no problem with #BayerExpertCare for Cats

We recently took in a stray cat that, quite honestly, had no business being out on the streets. This is Read More
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It’s been a long, stressful day, and you sink into a hot bubble bath, sighing with pleasure and relief.  The scent of lavender drifts through the steamy air, and you inhale deeply, every muscle in your body finally beginning to relax.  Instead of laying awake for an hour once your heard hits the pillow that night, you feel at ease and comfortable – and slip easily into sleep.

Have you ever wondered if your dog would enjoy a nice long soak?  Well, perhaps they wouldn’t sit still long enough to absorb a few chapters of the latest bestseller, but they can benefit from aromatherapy in other ways.  They may not go through the same sort of stress you go through in a day, but dogs do have stress – the sound of a car driving by, thunder rolling, their humans being away longer than expected, car rides, etc.  I’m betting that as you read this you’re thinking about a moment when your pet was freaking out and you weren’t sure what to do beyond talking to them soothingly and petting them (which are good things!).

At PetsWeekly, we’re familiar with the concept of aromatherapy as far as our pets go, and we want to introduce you to a set of awesome products by Earth Heart, Inc.  They currently have 3 different aromatherapy products available that were specifically designed for dogs by Vicki Rae Thorne, a certified aromatherapist and master herbalist.

Earth Heart Canine Calm Anti-Anxiety Spray for Dogs, 2 oz has pure essential oils of bergamot, tangerine, lavender, geranium, ylang ylang, and marjoram.  We personally used Canine Calm and it calmed our dogs down right away!  To use the spray, you simply spray it onto your hands and massage it into the dog’s outer ears or abdomen.  Another effective way to use Canine Calm is to spray it into the air behind their head, or even into their crates and bedding. Remember, a little goes a LONG way!

Earth Heart Travel Calm has all of the same essential oils as the Canine Calm, but also contains ginger, which helps soothe tummies that tend to get upset during car rides.  Try spraying Travel Calm in the car before you put your dog in for a far less stressful trip. It will even help relax the humans.

Guard Well contains pure essential oils of niaouli, ravensara, and frankincense to bring relief to all of those skin issues your canine friend can have – be it dry skin or itchiness caused by any number of possible allergic reactions.  Guard well is applied the same way as Canine Calm and Travel Calm.

The aromatherapy products at Earth Heart, Inc. are stellar, and we fully recommend you give them a try.  Here are a few tips for before and after your purchase:

  • Earth Heart aromatherapy products have been designed with dogs in mind – they aren’t recommended for cats or birds.
  • Introduce your dog to the Earth Heart products at a non-stressful time.  This will help them to form pleasant associations with the smell.
  • Read the posts on the Earth Heart blog.  There is a lot of valuable information here.
  • Read the FAQ on the Earth Heart website.
  • Keep a bottle of the Travel Calm in your doggy luggage or your own luggage in case of spur-of-the-moment trips.  This way you won’t be caught unprepared when you’re in a rush to get out the door.
  • Animal shelters, rescue organizations, and those who foster dogs should keep some Canine Calm and Travel Calm handy to help make the dogs they help get settled in more quickly and smoothly.

Earth Heart, Inc. was given two “2010 Best Pet Product” awards by FIDO Friendly Magazine, and Canine Calm won a Tails Pet Magazine “Staff Pick” award, and donated 100 bottles of their products to the United Aromatherapy Effort, who in turn donated them to canine units in Afghanistan.  We don’t have anything but positive things to say about the Earth Heart company or their products, and they have definitely earned the PetsWeekly seal of approval.

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stacymantlestacymantle
Author: stacymantle
About the Author

Stacy Mantle is a freelance writer who currently resides in the southwestern deserts of Arizona with a few dogs, several cats, and a very understanding husband. She is a regular contributor to Pet Age Magazine, Catster, Animal Behavior College, and of course, PetsWeekly. Many of her stories and articles have been translated into several languages, and now reach an international audience. She is also the author of a bestselling urban fantasy/thriller, Shepherd's Moon; a humor book entitled, Conquering the Food Chain: Living Amongst Animals (Without Becoming One), and a line of Educational Activity Books for children.


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