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Today we're looking at some materials you can use to either fence off your entire yard, or just build a cat enclosure. Either way, you're going to love this system from Purrfect Fence!

As you no doubt know by now, no less than fourteen cats own my very loving husband and me. Now these fourteen cats are unusual for many reasons, but they are most unusual in that they have, over the last 8 years, moved from being feral cats, to being "feral-ly" wild cats, to being "feral-ly" domesticated cats, to being "feral-ly" tolerable cats.

Feral cats, to begin with, are not the easiest animals in the world to get along with. Even when they have become "ferally domesticated", they remain difficult to live with. They are fiercely independent; they generally do not take instruction well, and are mostly argumentative just for the sake of being argumentative.

They also enjoy roaming outside, remaining hidden under the cloak of night, where they can stalk innocent and unsuspecting dogs that walk the sidewalks with their owners on the safety of leashes.

 

Our "ferally" domesticated cats' hobbies include spraying the windshields of neighbor's cars, pooping in meticulously cared for gardens, and creating as much noise as possible in the earliest morning hours. For very good reason, they made us the most unpopular people in our neighborhood.


Despite these problems however, we have managed to rebuild relationships due to a shared interest in keeping animals safe and off the street. The treaty allows us to work closely with our neighbors as there are only a few of us willing to take the time to needed to manage what was a fast-growing colony. With neighbors contributing towards TNR costs, myself and a small group of other cat-lovers make sure that any strays who show up are promptly spayed or neutered, properly vaccinated, and are kept fed so that they do not harm any of the birds that reside in our area. This small community action has not only stabilized the colony, but kept animals from being harmed.

Those that we felt could be domesticated were taken in by those of us who have rescue resources in play.  That means, we have to focus on a safe area that allows plenty of room to play. However, containment has always been a problem. That's when I found Purrfect Fence and it's been the purrfect solution to our problems.

Purrfect Fence is nearly invisible when it's set up. Now, I'm not saying it is like Harry Potter's invisibility cloak, because that would just be silly. But it's pretty close, and really, Potter would be proud. The fence was originally designed to keep deer out of gardens - but Purr...fect Fence found it is wonderful at keeping cats in yards.

The main point in keeping cats enclosed is to help keep your cats safe and your neighbors happy. The enclosures come in 100 square foot set ups and since my dogs balked at having the majority of their yard taken over by our felines, I reluctantly only able to use only 20 feet of the fencing system, donating the remainder to a no-kill shelter. The very happy recipient of the remaining 80 feet of my enclosure was Miss Kitty's Cat House, a no-kill cat shelter located in Prescott, Arizona.

My husband and I drove up, delivered, and installed this enclosure for the very grateful rescue group. What makes this particular rescue unique is that the felines live in a house all by themselves - over 20 cats in one beautiful home overlooking the valley of Prescott. The drawback? They can't go outside because it's too dangerous. But no more - now they can spend all day long lounging in the sun thanks to the generosity of Purr...fect Fence. And that, my friends, is precisely what they did. The first thing that they did was test their boundaries. They tried to climb up the fence (no luck - too flimsy), they searched below (too solid), attempted to dig out (to deeply staked), and tried to bite through the fence (too strong). The fencing system was impenetrable. Not only could the cats not get out, predators could not get in! It has foiled all species - both feline and canine. Now because I am limited in space, I cannot discuss in detail the construction of this wonderful system, nor can I explain how much my cats, Miss Kitty's shelter cats, and especially my neighbors, enjoy this enclosure. So - let me just say that within one day of setting it up, two volunteers at Miss Kitty's had requested information on the system to purchase for their own kitties. It is well worth the investment. To find out more, please visit the Cat Shopping section and tell them Stacy's neighbors sent you.


From the cats: Hisses & Spits: If we HAVE to be confined, I guess this is better than being stuck in a house. Purrs: I suppose we are appreciative of our humans looking after our safety, but this fence sure takes the fun and adventure out of life.
From the humans: Two opposable thumbs up! Drawback? The setup directions are sorely in need of a rewrite - watch the video for the best help, or be creative on setting it up! However, a little birdie told me they are in the process of rewriting the directions..


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stacymantle
Author: stacymantle
About the Author

Stacy Mantle is a freelance writer who currently resides in the southwestern deserts of Arizona with a few dogs, several cats, and a very understanding husband. She is a regular contributor to Pet Age Magazine, Catster, Animal Behavior College, and of course, PetsWeekly. Many of her stories and articles have been translated into several languages, and now reach an international audience. She is also the author of a bestselling urban fantasy/thriller, Shepherd's Moon; a humor book entitled, Conquering the Food Chain: Living Amongst Animals (Without Becoming One), and a line of Educational Activity Books for children.


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