Text Size

 Stay up-to-date with our newsletter. It's free & you'll be able to access our articles, stories, giveaways and savings. We only send you a summary of things you have missed and we never sell your information.

Subscribe Now
  • Behavior Problems? We have answers.

    Learn about behavior from our team of experts. Whether you have cats, dogs, reptiles, horses or birds, we can help you learn to live with them. Read More
  • All About Horses

    Learn about equine science, whether you're an aspiring rider or a long-time owner, we have the latest in products, breeds, and more. Read More
  • Traveling with Pets

    Be sure to check this section out before you hit the road with your pet! We've got a look at pet-friendly hotels, the guidelines of air, train, bus and auto travel, and much more. Read More
  • All About Critters

    Take a look at what it means to have ferrets, rabbits, mice, rats, guinea pigs, and more. Read More
  • All About Reptiles

    A look at our cold-blooded friends and discovering how to care for these fun loving creatures! Read More
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 10 Possible Reasons Your Cat Is Behaving Badly

    If your healthy cat is suddenly peeing on your bed or spraying in your office, if he's taken to running around at strange hours of the night, or mewing inconsolably all night, there are several possible explanations. Of course, you must always take them in for a vet check to eliminate any possible health conditions like blockages or disease. But health problems have been eliminated and your cat is still acting out inappropriately, here are some possible explanations.

    Room Deodorizers

    Everyone has probably used a room deodorizer in their home, particularly if they have cats. One of the most common places to put diffusers and other such items are near the litter-box. Avoid doing this! It can cause undue stress on  your cats and even make it difficult for them to use the litter box.

    Solve This: Instead of placing a deodorizer or diffuser near your cat's box, try one of the helpful Litter Box Deodorizers on the market. You can also tape live charcoal on the side or the bottom of the box or sprinkle the box with baking soda prior to putting cat litter inside.

    Read More
  • Keeping Pets Safe from Coyotes

    No matter where you live, you’ve likely had to deal with wildlife. Whether its mountain lions and coyotes, or squirrels and deer, we live in a world with a rapidly increasing human population –  which means we are continually infringing on wildlife. The more we infringe on their territory, take their water supply and diminish their prey, the more they will be forced to enter our domestic havens. And whether you like it or not, coyotes are a very important part of nature’s balance.

    The one question we get most frequently is how to deal with wild animals that enter our yards threaten our dogs and cats. We are very strong believers in maintaining a symbiotic relationship with nature, so it’s important to us that we raise awareness on the issue. This week, we are discussing how you can keep your pets safe from coyotes and we’re including a whole section on how to do this in step-by-step format...

    Read More
  • Dog Etiquette: Leashes

    Recently, we posted on Facebook that we were out walking our dogs and experienced two small, off-leash dogs aggressively running to our much larger, leashed dogs. My dogs were both on-leash and controlled, but I was still annoyed. After posting my experience, I received a lot of responses - some of which were a bit negative due to the fact that one of my dogs looks like a pit bull (apparently I shouldn't be walking him?). Here’s the thing: It doesn’t matter if my dogs are pit bulls or chihuahuas or golden retrievers. In fact, I could have been walking alone, or riding a horse, or walking my cat. The fact is, dogs of any size should never run up on another person or animal without being invited to do so. It’s a common courtesy that could save your dog’s life.

    Here are just a few reasons why...

    Read More
  • Winter Caretaking of Feral Cats

    We have long been supporters of feral cats and advocate the use of Trap, Neuter & Release (TNR) as a form of managing feral cat colonies. Caretakers who support these animals are a special breed as they are able to care for an animal that is unable to care back – as far as we’re concerned, that’s the truest type of love.

    It makes us very happy when we can introduce new products designed specifically to keep feral cats safe and warm, while making the caretakers job a little bit easier. Today I want to show off a specialty feral cat house and a feral cat feeder that is available for purchase. While it is entirely possible to make a feral cat shelter and feeding platform, we know that many people would prefer to buy one ready-made and Feline Furniture is our “go to” group for these products.

    Read More
  • Fencing Solutions to Keep Dogs Contained

    If you have a dog, you know how difficult it can be to keep them on your property. Sometimes dogs just want to escape the confines of their yard, but it's our responsibility as guardians to ensure our pets are within our control at all times - even those times we're not physically with them. Fences make for good neighbors, and they make much safer environments for pets. Here are five ways you can fence your yard and the costs, the benefits and the dangers of each.

    The type of fencing you ultimately select should be based on your geographical region, your HOA guidelines (if you have them), and the type of dog(s) you are containing. You'll also need to consider your weather. If you're in an area with lots of weather, you'll want to consider installing a more durable type of fencing. If you live in an area with snow, the snow can pile up near the gates and provide a near perfect way for your pets to escape. But, if you have a dog that is regularly escaping from your yard, consider reading this article or implementing some of these practical tips below:

    Read More
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

5 Questions to Ask Before Getting Chickens

There is a lot of interest in chicken keeping these days. With the cost of food skyrocketing, chickens can be Read More

Keeping Pets Safe from Coyotes

No matter where you live, you’ve likely had to deal with wildlife. Whether its mountain lions and coyotes, or squirrels Read More

5 Ways to Help Birds in Winter on #NationalBirdDay

January 5 is officially National Bird Day and we're looking at ways that we can help our feathered friends during Read More

Getting Old Sucks - Cognitive Dysfuntion in Dogs (CCD)

As most of you know, we have a dog who has just turned 15 years old. He’s half blind, almost Read More

Teaching Children to Approach Horses

I have a problem with parents who just allow their kids just run up to strange animals. In fact today, Read More

Tapeworms are no problem with #BayerExpertCare for Cats

We recently took in a stray cat that, quite honestly, had no business being out on the streets. This is Read More
  • 1

Welcome to PetsWeekly

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive
 

iCat Competition CatiCat Competition Cat

Cat agility, in its official competition form, has been around for nearly a decade. In October of 2003, Vickie Shields, along with a small group of friends, held the very first official cat agility competition, and the International Cat Agility Tournaments (ICAT) began. As with so many things that involve pets, cat agility grew quickly in popularity, and in February, 2005, the Cat Fanciers Association (CFA) held their first competition during the Oregon Cats show.

Agility training, even if you have no intention of competing, is a great way to make sure your cat gets the exercise they need and the entertainment they crave. You may be sitting there wondering how you can train your cats to dart through tunnels and weave around a set of poles when you can’t even get them to use the scratching post instead of the corner of your couch. Yes, cats do seem less interested in pleasing others than your average dog, but just like dog training, you only need to know what toys and/or treats are most appealing to your cat to get started.

Before you begin any sort of training or exercise regimen with your cat, please consult a phys—I mean, veterinarian. Teaching them to jump through hoops may seem harmless, but a check up at the vet’s office is always advised to make sure there aren’t any underlying issues that might be aggravated by the training process. Your vet can also be a great source of valuable information, such as how much is “too much” training in a day, and if your cat should be given extra food when in training, even if it’s not for competition purposes.

Just as in dog training, there are different methods in use when it comes to cat agility training. The simplest appears to be using toys to “lure” the cat through an obstacle course. After repeated runs, they get used to the pattern of the course and complete it faster and faster. This method is quite popular, and would work well for “amateur” kitties who don’t have any plans on going pro.

Others use more traditional training methods most commonly seen in dog training: Spoken commands and clicker training. If this surprises you, we understand why. Cats are known to be intelligent creatures, but they also have a reputation for doing what they want, when they want. But, if you make it fun and there’s food involved – most cats will be game for at least a small training session now and then!

Not every cat will be capable of, or agreeable to, agility training. You can certainly attempt to train any cat that has their vet’s clearance to proceed, but it’s best to start when your cat is young. If your cat is no longer a frisky kitten, but they like to play, then you’re already a giant step ahead! Start slow and keep it fun for both of you. As you know, attempting to force a cat to do anything they’re not interested in doing is futile.

If you’re interested in training your cat, visit the ICAT and CFA websites. There’s plenty of information there to get you started.

Note from the editor’s cat: While cat agility competitions are reported to have been started by humans, don’t be fooled. It was a cat who, like myself, became quite sick and tired of letting canines keep the spotlight all to themselves, that spurred the very first contest. Known for our natural agility and grace, we, the feline kind, set out to show Fido and his friends that cats can run an obstacle course without even putting a whisker out of place—and without all the uncouth drooling and tail wagging.

Other Articles You May Enjoy:


New in Dogs

New in Cats

New in Horses

New in PetsGEEKly

Subscribe to PetsWeekly for the latest pet news, giveaways, and more!    Stay informed!