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Cat Behavior
Vetting Your Cat Veterinarian PDF Print E-mail
Written by Jane Ehrlich   
Friday, 17 April 2015 00:00

You check the references of your physicians. You check the references of a person who does home repair. You want to know their experience, their background, who recommends them and why.

When I researched how much feline behavior veterinarians received in their DVM curricula, I was unhappily surprised.  Even in the best universities, most (few) classes were only possible for postgraduate work. You could get as much information on sugar gliders and goats as on cats’ mental and emotional life. Odd, that in a country where the most popular domestic pet is now the cat--and where more households have two cats, rather than one...

It’s your fur-baby. You want someone well-versed in feline behavior, as well as physiognomy, whether obtained through coursework or experience through personal interest.   This is about evaluating the practitioner, not the practice.


Last Updated on Friday, 17 April 2015 16:56
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Types of Aggression in Cats - Part 1 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Jane Ehrlich   
Monday, 06 April 2015 22:53

Whap! Snarl! Hiss! Chase! Scrabblescramble. Cry!   STOP IT!  ISAIDSTOPPIT!

Who hasn’t been there?  Anyone who hasn’t had more than one cat.

Aggression trails only soiling outside the box as the big behavior problem. And, until you figure out the type of aggression, it can be hard to stop it.

The good news: you can. There are several distinct kinds. Sure, it ends up the same way: someone gets hurt: you or another cat. However, the more you know about why the skirmish is happening, the better you can manage the situation. Several of the most common types include:            


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Veterinarians Need Behaviorists and So Do Pets PDF Print E-mail
Written by Jane Ehrlick   
Friday, 24 October 2014 00:00

I was the only feline behavior consultant attending last year's American Animal Hospital Association conference, as far as I knew. I was neither a vet, nor a vet tech. After the four days, I left with a notebook of interesting bits to pass on to my clients, yes, but also confirmation that feline behavior was still low on the vet's priority list.

The "feline track" was small. Very doggist. Even a talk on fear and aggression handling for clinic staff was 90% dog. (The lecturer, the late vet-behaviorist Sophia Yin, admitted there was "too little known about cats" and that she didn't know 'all that much.')

One of the biggest names in veterinary medicine, Niels Pedersen, author of the book on feline infectious diseases, advised me, "Behavior? It's either sex or stress. If it's sex, castrate 'em. Stress? Drug 'em." Oh, well that's all right, then.

It's a common attitude. After speakers' talks on non-medical feline matters at several conferences, I asked the same question: How can we get more vets to use behavior consultants? Nobody had answers. In true displacement gesturing, I (metaphorically) scratch my head in frustration. Story thus far: many vets aren't very interested.


Last Updated on Monday, 06 April 2015 22:44
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How to Make A TeePee for Pets #PAW2014 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Stacy Mantle   
Thursday, 11 September 2014 21:57

This week, Tractor Supply Company invited us to visit their store and challenged us to create a unique Do-It-Yourself project that would benefit shelter animals.

This is a tougher assignment than you may think for several reasons. First, it’s hard to create something that is easily cleaned, yet still serves a purpose. Second, we had a budget of $25. Third, I’m not very crafty.

But, I accepted the challenge and sought creative inspiration by embracing Arizona's Native American heritage. I decided to make a pet teepee because of it's unique ability to provide shade, calm pets, and mostly because it's different...

After buying all of my supplies at Tractor Supply, I came in so drastically under budget that I even had enough left over from my $25 budget to buy: THREE giant smoked Jones Knuckle Bones for my dogs, as well as a new brush, and I even picked up a bonus project that shelters can use to make money during the upcoming holiday season! (More on that at the end of the article).


Last Updated on Tuesday, 16 September 2014 17:56
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Giving medication to your hard-to-medicate pets PDF Print E-mail
Written by Stacy Mantle   
Thursday, 29 May 2014 00:00

We've always been told that a spoonful of sugar makes the medicine go down. But when it comes to pet, nothing could be further from the truth. And please - never give your pets a spoonful of sugar to offset or disguise the misery of giving them medicine.

There are lots of other ways to give your pets a pill without traumatizing you or them. From Pill Paste to compounding to trickery, we have a way to make those meds go down with no fuss and no hospital visits.


Last Updated on Thursday, 29 May 2014 22:28
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