Search PetsWeekly

Cat Facts
Facts about our fascinating felines

Ailurophilia is the "love of cats."

There are more than 500 million domestic cats in the world, with 33 different breeds.

The American cat population reached nearly 68 million in 1996.  American Demographics magazine estimates that's about 200 million kitty yawns per hour (and 425 million catnaps each day)!

A cat's heart beats twice as fast as a human heart, at 110 to 140 beats per minute.

A cat's normal body temperature is 101.5 degrees. This is slightly warmer than a human.

Calico cats are almost always female.

The Giraffe, Camel and Cat are the only animals that walk by moving both their left feet, then both their right feet, when walking. This method of walking ensures speed, agility and silence.

If an overweight cat's "sides" stick out further than her whiskers, she will lose her sense of perception and stability. Don't be surprised if she starts to squeeze into an opening that the rest of her can't fit into, only to  back herself back out quickly!

There are two species of wild cats in African and Europe that still hunt. These two species both resemble the domestic tabbies.

Backward-pointing spikes on a cat's tongue aid in their grooming.

The average cat weighs 12 pounds.

At birth, kittens can't see or hear. Cats open their eyes after five days and begin to develop their eyesight and hearing at approximately 2 weeks. They begin to walk at 20 days.

Cats eyes come in three shapes: round, slanted and almond.

Cats need 1/6th the amount of light that humans do to see.

Cats are partially color blind. They have the equivalency of human red/green color blindness. (Reds appear green and greens appear red; or shades thereof.)

Cats don't see "detail" very well. To them, their person may appear hazy when standing in front of them.

Cats can see up to 120 feet away. Their peripheral vision is about 285 degrees.

The color of a kitten's eyes will change as it grows older.

Kittens begin dreaming at just over one week old.

Many experts report that cats will purr when feeling any intense emotion (pleasure or pain).

Cats roll on their backs to show affection. They expose their bellies like this only when they feel totally secure.

Cats with long, lean bodies are more likely to be outgoing personalities than their stockier cousins. They are also more protective of their home and more vocal and demonstrative.

The behaviors shown by most house cats have a parallel in the wild.

A cat will kill it's prey based on movement, but may not necessarily recognize that prey as food. Realizing that prey is food is a learned behavior.

"PSI trailings" attempt to explain a cat's ability to travel a long distance to return to their home. It is said they use the earth's gravity to determine "their place" in the world, and to develop the ability to return there when necessary.

RocketTheme Joomla Templates
Copyright ©2004 PetsWeekly All Rights Reserved