Text Size

Dog Health | PetsWeekly

Summertime Skin Care for Pets: Protecting Your Pet from Sun

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

The sun is particularly harmful to pets living in the Northwestern part of the United States (especially WA, OR, ID, MT, WY and UT). These areas have the highest incidence in skin cancer both in pets and people.

Our pets are subject to a host of maladies, but one of the most common, and least talked about, is skin cancer. Mast cell skin cancer is the most common skin cancer in pets and it can show up anywhere on the body.

According to the National Canine Cancer Foundation, "Melanoma occurs commonly in dogs with pigmented (dark) skin. Melanomas arise from pigment producing cells called melanocytes, which are responsible for coloring the skin."

Dogs that are at an increased risk to develop melanoma (suggesting that this disease may have a hereditary component) include:

Read more: Summertime Skin Care for Pets: Protecting Your Pet from Sun

Earth's Balance Sponsors Our Trip to BlogPaws

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

One of the great things about being a writer is the ability to attend conferences. This year, we are very fortunate to be able to attend the BlogPaws conference for the second time in its six-year history – thanks to the generosity of Earth’s Balance, a new brand from Marshall Pet. They will also be in attendance at the show, and talking about their newest all-natural, made in the USA brand of products.

We are especially excited about their sponsorship because of their commitment to earth-friendly solutions for pet problems which, as you know, is our focus here at PetsWeekly. Earth’s Balance is committed to providing effective, affordable solutions to common issues such as allergies (in pets and people), lawn burn, giving a pill, cleaning up household spills, and so much more…

Read more: Earth's Balance Sponsors Our Trip to BlogPaws

Regaining a Friend - Weight Loss with HillsPet Metabolic Diet

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

We don’t always know our pets are gaining weight. Sometimes it sneaks in gradually, just as it does with humans, until one day we wake up and look in the mirror thinking, “When did this happen?”

Each animal poses unique challenges when it comes to weight gain. They are, after all, much like humans.  What my thin friend can safely eat, I cannot without paying the price in weight gain. And sometimes, it’s not overeating that causes weight gain, it’s the way your pet processes their food.

But, to help an animal, you have to reach the owner. And no one wants to hear that their pet is overweight.

Bear is one such pet.

Read more: Regaining a Friend - Weight Loss with HillsPet Metabolic Diet

GMOs in Pet Food: What they are and How they Impact our Pets

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) are a hot topic right now, but maybe not for the right reasons. We hear the term GMO and immediately assume it is terrible for us and for our pets. While we totally agree that is a dangerous movement, we believe it is dangerous due to its impact on our environment and society, as well as consumption, although the truth is, no one knows know for sure as there have been no long-term studies done. The most recent studies coming out are not exactly encouraging...

But, the fact is, we and our pets have probably been consuming GMOs for years without even knowing it. So, what is so bad about GMOs and why should we avoid them? Well, here’s a “quick overview to GMOs” we put together…

Read more: GMOs in Pet Food: What they are and How they Impact our Pets

Caring for Your Senior Dog

User Rating: 5 / 5

Star ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar ActiveStar Active

Cheiss is celebrating his 13th birthday this year and while he's still in pretty good health, there are signs of his advanced age appearing before my eyes. He stumbles when chasing the ball. He doesn't want to play for 30 minutes a night and is instead content with a few good runs. He is grumpy with the cats (who he at one time adored), and he snips at his canine siblings. We finally had to break down and put him on a daily dose of Rimadyl and he's been on glucosamine supplements for over a year. It's these things that remind me - none of us is exempt from aging.

It’s a fact of life: we all get slower as we age and dogs aren't any different. Some signs of aging are very apparent, like hair turning gray, but other signs are more subtle - for example your dog may play a bit less and sleep a bit more. It’s believed that dogs reach their senior years when they’re between seven and ten years of age, and while I"ve been very fortunate in having most of my rescued, mixed-breed dogs live to the ripe old age of 17, they do slow down much earlier.

Your dog has stood by you and shown you an abundance of love and now that he’s reached his senior years, there are a few things you can do to make his “golden years” more relaxing. These changes include alterations in diet, routine veterinary visits for screening, and new ways to keep your pet relaxed. This is especially important in high-energy dogs who have the propensity to hurt themselves at play.

Read more: Caring for Your Senior Dog

Subscribe to PetsWeekly for the latest pet news, giveaways, and more!    Stay informed!