Text Size

Dog Behavior | PetsWeekly

Conquering Your Pets Wintertime Blues

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

People aren't the only ones susceptible to wintertime blues. According to Mary Lee Nitschke, professor of psychology at Linfield College in Oregon, pets are just as likely to become depressed during winter as their people.

People aren't the only ones who get the blues during the dark winter days. So do pets, says Mary Lee Nitschke, professor of psychology at Linfield College in Oregon.

"If your healthy dog or cat becomes lethargic or loses interest in everyday activities, they may be suffering from a simple lack of stimulation,” said Nitschke.  “Other signs to look for include a decrease in appetite.”

So how do you keep your pets healthy during the long winter months? There are a number of ways to do this.

Read more: Conquering Your Pets Wintertime Blues

Beating the Back to School Blues: Tips on leaving pets behind

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

School is back in session and that can mean some lonely dogs left at home.  Now that their human playmates have returned to class, sports and lessons, it’s time to help your pets find a new hobby. Here are some tips for getting your pet through that initial rough patch.

Eliminate Separation Anxiety

Returning kids to classes can be hard on your dog, so be sure you keep them calm by making them understand you’ll be returning. Gradually reduce the amount of interaction you have with your pets and begin the return to a strict schedule of playtime, mealtime and treat time.  By establishing the new routine firmly in your pets mind, you will reduce the anxiety associated with leaving.

Read more: Beating the Back to School Blues: Tips on leaving pets behind

Keep Your Pets Calm This Fourth of July

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

Soon we’ll be celebrating the passage of another year of American freedom with cookouts, parties and probably fireworks of some sort – all of which create noises – loud noises that your pets may not be used to. This can spell trouble for unprepared pets and owners, so let us help you get prepared! (Cat owners, read on – dogs aren’t the only ones that get disturbed by loud noise and party crowds - we've got suggestions for all species!)

Your first step should be to get yourself in a calm place mentally. If you’re feeling anxious about how your pets will behave when the fireworks start, you’re already setting them up for failure. They read off of your emotions and “vibes,” so a part of your pets’ anxiety will melt away if you maintain a positive attitude and go into it with at least little bit of joy, rather than trepidation. Do whatever you can to make it a positive experience. “Ooh” and “aah” at the sights and sounds, pass out treats and have a little party of your own. This will help pets associate the Fourth of July with, “Yay, we get extra treats and cuddle/play time!”

Read more: Keep Your Pets Calm This Fourth of July

The Life of an Animal Communicator

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

When Faye Pietrokowsky, well known animal communicator and intuitive, agreed to do a guest post for PetsWeekly, we were super excited. We hope after reading more about Faye, you'll visit her at her website and learn how you can talk to your animals.

When people learn that I do pet and people (business and personal) intuitive work, they almost always have questions that they sometimes aren't comfortable asking. For some reason, it seems easier for people to ask about communicating with animals than my work with humans. I suspect this is because many animal  lovers understand that animals talk even if their humans don't understand. As the pet industry grows by leaps and bounds every year, more attention is being given to our pets and their world. Thanks to the media and the proliferation of people who live with animals, the human public is more open and receptive to entertaining the notion that animals are complex (expressions, thoughts, behaviors, abilities, etc.). Communicating with animals is as natural for some humans as talking to people.  In my experience, both species are complex and reading people isn't different than reading animals.

Read more: The Life of an Animal Communicator

6 Tips for a Happy “Take Your Dog to Work Day”

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

Take Your Dog to Work Day, is rapidly approaching, so PetsWeekly is here with some helpful tips and reminders on how to make this year’s joining of home and work life a success.

For those of you who’ve taken your dogs with you to work before, this stuff is old hat. But, if you’ve never had the privilege of taking your favorite fluffy friend with you to the office, it’s critical that you prepare your workplace, yourself and—most importantly—your dog for the party!

1. Check with your employer

If office memos and posters haven’t made it obvious already, ask management if they’re celebrating Take Your Dog to Work Day this year. If they are, ask for information on their policies regarding the holiday and any special events planned for the day. If they’re not, then talk to them about the possibility of celebrating next year. Above all, be understanding.

Read more: 6 Tips for a Happy “Take Your Dog to Work Day”

Subscribe to PetsWeekly for the latest pet news, giveaways, and more!    Stay informed!