Text Size

Cat Rescue and Humor Stories | PetsWeekly

Corporate Cats

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

Ever since Spike took up residence in a St. Louis bookstore, he has become a draw for customers and has been lovingly cared for by the employees. As a cat that seems to thrive in a work place, Spike is hardly alone. "Over the past several years, we've noted an increase in the number of firms allowing people to bring their pets to work with them," says Bob Vetere, president of the American Pet Products Manufacturers Association (APPMA), a Connecticut-based nonprofit. The trend seems to make everyone happy. Vetere indicates workers are less worried about their cats or dogs at home, and so they tend to work longer hours and take fewer days off. Bosses are pleased because their pool of workers is larger and more reliable. And, although no animals were willing to speak on the record for this article, guesses are they are enjoying the increased attention a lot more than being left home alone all day. "Most employers we surveyed indicated that there was more worker satisfaction when a pet was present," says Vetere, referring to the national survey on this subject recently conducted by APPMA. Not only is it a huge relief to not need to rush home at lunch or be out the door at 5 to feed a cherished cat, but it's also proven that animals can have a calming effect on their humans.

Read more: Corporate Cats

Mixed-breed Cats No Longer Outclassed

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

For the last four years, Carol Smith, a Boston-area cat breeder and small-business owner, has been showing her cat, Kelsey Belle, competitively. Smith breeds Egyptian Maus cats, but unpedigreed Kelsey Belle is a former shelter cat. However, Kelsey Belle is a cat show natural. “She rolls over on the judging table, purring and licking the judges. She’s well-regarded for her presence and easy handling,” says Smith. “She really enjoys it, especially the traveling and ‘spa treatments’ before the shows.” In cat show lingo, mixed-breed felines like Smith’s pet are referred to as a household pets (HHP). Does your own pet have what it takes to be in show business? Longtime HHP judge William Lee weighs in on what it takes to be best in show.

Read more: Mixed-breed Cats No Longer Outclassed

Things I've Learned From My Cat

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive
  • A cat can throw up twice its body weight in hairballs.
    • When given the choice between a tile floor or an oriental rug, the cat will always choose the rug to be sick on.
  • The saliva of a cat contains a bone-dissolving agent that is used to digest the bones of fish and small birds.

Are Cats Purring Us Into Submission?

User Rating: 0 / 5

Star InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar InactiveStar Inactive

cat lying downIs it true? Could we possibly be under the control of our cats soothing purrs? Are they going to purr us into submission, forcing us to be more social so they can turn around and conquer the world? It’s possible, according to a recent study. Okay, maybe not the "taking over the world" part but who really knows what our favorite felines have in store for us? Although many animals (including guinea pigs and elephants) are capable of purring, cats are the most well-known for it. Their low rumble is emitted at an amazing 27 Hz, comparable to the lowest note on a piano. Animal vocalization experts have identified a new purr that our feline friends have recently developed and it’s known as the “socialization purr.” It’s true. According to animal vocalization experts Anna Taylor, Christian Wilson, Karen McComb and Benjamin Charlton, all purrs are not created equally. The team has examined the acoustic structure of recorded purrs and has determined that one is used as socialization purring.

Read more: Are Cats Purring Us Into Submission?

Feline Behavior

  • Is Mint Safe for Cats?

    Hello Grey Socks, Every time I put toothpaste on my brush, which is mint flavored, my cat wants to lick it. She goes completely banana's over it. Is it okay to let her lick some? Thanks,
    Kathy Easley

    Read More +
  • Wool-sucking in cats

    Dear Kyra, I have an adopted 5-month-old ginger boy named Barney. He's a very sweet, funny kitty, and I love him to pieces. But...he has some strange quirks. The nice people at the animal shelter told me that he was… Read More +

  • Cats covering feces

    Dear Ghost, Why do cats cover their feces? My two cats are neurotic about covering up everything in their litter box, which is stupid because it's automatic anyway. Is it really necessary? Thanks,
    Kristin

    Read More +
  • Cats spraying

    Baby, I live with 2 male cats (neutered) and 1 female cat (spayed). All of a sudden they have started spraying (they are 1 year old). They have sprayed my bed, my doors and in my closet (that I know of). I'm… Read More +

  • hypersthesia

    Mama-San, My 1 yr old tabby has developed a fear of its tail! The end twitches and she sometimes lightly attacks it, but most times just runs from it (especially at night) your site mentions anger in connection with tip- twitching.… Read More +

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  • 6
  • 7
  • 8
  • 9

Subscribe to PetsWeekly for the latest pet news, giveaways, and more!    Stay informed!