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June is #AdoptAShelterCatMonth and that means it's time to join in the festivities and celebrate all thing cat! We really hope you're planning to go to your local shelter and adopt one of the millions of cats and kittens in need this month.

You do know that next month starts the Fireworks, Thunderstorms & Monsoon Season - and that means more animals than ever will be showing up at rescues around the world. It's more important than ever that you help empty the shelters before that happens.

Of course, the number one thing you can do in June is adopt a shelter cat . Why not? After all, they make the absolute best cats! We prefer black cats (because they are so incredible loving and the are always the last to be adopted). But, even if you're not ready to add a new cat to your life, there are many other ways to help.

These are five of our favorite ways to help out cats during Adopt a Shelter Cat Month.

 

1. Help Shelters Stock Up on Supplies

There isn't an animal rescue or shelter out there that isn't low on supplies. And even if they do happen to be stocked up, they have a "wish list" of supplies that would make their lives easier. Find a cat shelter near you and see what they're wish list, then help them out with a direct shipment.

Choose one shelter and help them stock up for the summer rush of lost pets that fill the shelters on July 4. Find a list of shelters in your area, then ask your community to adopt that shelter through the month of June by donating one or more items.

You can also log into Amazon through their Amazon Smiles program. With this program, a percentage of ANY shopping you do will go directly to your favorite nonprofit (and yes, you can choose which ones!). It will not effect your pricing on anything.

2. Foster a Cat (or family of cats)

Shelters need as much space as they can get, particularly with the 4th of July coming up so quickly. Why not consider fostering if you're not ready for adoption? In most cases, animal rescues and shelters can get the cats placed pretty quickly if given half a chance. By helping out by caring for those most in need, you create an opportunity for another animal to live. All shelters and animal rescues (big and small) have an urgent need for people to help by Fostering Kittens.

In many cases, entire families of mama-cat and her kittens just need a safe place to grow up for a few weeks.

The shelter generally helps with all medical expenses and you will have the option to adopt if you so choose.  So, delegate one room of your home to serve as a “kitten nursery” or foster an older cat while a family is found.

And if you don't volunteer, you may just come to this... (#NotMyCat)

3. Educate Others

There are many different ways you can help educate others about the importance of adoption and rescuing cats. One way is to visit Pinterest  and find some fun, educational facts in a visual format, then share on your social media.

For example, here are some fun facts about Tabby Cats and Their Patterns with plenty of photos that you can share. 

4. Read to Shelter Animals

Are you looking for something for your kids to do this summer? If so, consider taking them down to your local animal shelter to read to the cats.

Cats are extremely nervous when they're in a confined environment. Oftentimes, the very act of sitting near them and quietly reading to them will help them relax and become more social. Contact your local rescue today and see if they have a reading program in place or maybe need help coordinating and setting up a program.

 

 

5. Volunteer

The shelters are always in need of volunteers who can help out with their cats. Sometimes this means cleaning cages, other times it means interacting and playing with cats so they can have a short break from their cages.

Contact your local animal shelter and learn about the process to become a volunteer.

6. Organize a TNR Event

If you live in an area that has feral cats running around and no obvious management being done to control sizes of colonies, it may be time to start a Trap/Neuter/Return event.

Controlling population growth is one way we keep the stray population down. Also, maybe then cats won't take over the world or cause The Decline of Western Civilization. (haha)

If you're not sure if they are managed or not, contact your local HOA or pin a note to an area where you see cats gather for food every night. You should also visit AlleyCat Rescue, the ultimate resource for managing feral cat populations in a humane way. This is a review of their book, Alley Cat Rescue: The Only Book You’ll Need for TNR)

7. Buy an Adoption Gift Certificate for A Friend or Family Member

As all PetsWeekly.com readers know, you should never buy or adopt a pet of any species for a family member or friend without them first meeting a pet. Just like us, animals don't always get along with everyone they meet. Some personalities mesh bet

ter than others. Sometimes, a person may say they are interested in adopting, but they need to be the one who chooses the animal.

Giving an adoption certificate is always appropriate! Who knows? It may be the exact motivation your friends need to adopt and change their life forever.

All animal rescues offer gift certificates that allow you to pay for the cost of the adoption (which covers spay/neuter, vaccines, and ensures your friend is getting a healthy pet). Present your friend with this certificate, then head on down to the shelter and meet everyone!

8. Spread the Word on Social Media

Visit your local animal shelter or rescue page and find one long-term shelter cat near you who might need some extra attention, then create a photo (or share the one they have) with your family and friends. Sometimes cats end up in shelters for long periods of time and it's important to get word to that exact right family so they know their fur-ever friend is available for adoption.

We also have a wide selection of humorous photos about why you should adopt a black cat!

9. Make Shelter Animals Some New Beds

One of the things that can create more sadness than anything in animals is the fact that they are resigned to lying on cold, hard floors or metal cages. Consider getting a group of friends or family together and make some beds for these animals.

Simple Patterns for Simple Cat Beds
There are only a couple of designs that work in a shelter environment, so be sure you ask your shelter what their needs are before you make a dozen beds. Here are some patterns to give you ideas of what's needed.

If you're not super inclined to make a bed, you can donate one that is generally approved for shelters. It's called the Kuranda Bed and you can learn more about their donation program on their site.

10. Adopt

I can't say this enough. Cats need our help right now. It's kitten season, the shelters and rescues are FULL, and they need help with getting animals adopted. There are thousands of special programs and discounts occurring right now that makes adoption a super easy, very affordable thing to do. We have to get shelters cleared before July or more animals than ever will die.

If you can't adopt, help shelters. Everything helps.

Don’t forget that #NationalHugYourCatDay is on June 4 this year! 

 

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stacymantle
Author: stacymantle
About the Author

Stacy Mantle is a freelance writer who currently resides in the southwestern deserts of Arizona with a few dogs, several cats, and a very understanding husband. She is a regular contributor to Pet Age Magazine, Catster, Animal Behavior College, and of course, PetsWeekly. Many of her stories and articles have been translated into several languages, and now reach an international audience. She is also the author of a bestselling urban fantasy/thriller, Shepherd's Moon; a humor book entitled, Conquering the Food Chain: Living Amongst Animals (Without Becoming One), and a line of Educational Activity Books for children.


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