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Cat Health | PetsWeekly

World's Most Expensive Cat Food Launched in UK

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Still trying to find that special food your finicky feline may just enjoy? If it’s in your budget, you may want to check out the world’s most expensive cat food (so far) retails at £249.99 for a 4.5 pound bag. In US dollars, that breaks out to just about $312 per bag or around $70 per pound. 

Assuming you are feeding just three of these bags a month, you’re looking at a food bill of nearly $11,000 per year to cater to your cat. So what’s in this expensive cat food?

To begin with, it's designed for "All Life Stages" and made from natural human-grade raw materials. It contains bio-active herbs and is grain-free. But the actual hypo-allergenic, holistic ingredients are the true selling point.

Here’s a sneak peak at the ingredients:

Read more: World's Most Expensive Cat Food Launched in UK

5 Reasons Feral Cat Day Shouldn’t Freak You Out

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There’s been a battle brewing for years against feral cats, and some of the more hateful humans are setting out to kill them all (yes, this has been proposed by some quite unscrupulous people).

When it comes to cats, you’re going to hear everything from feral cats killing billions of birds a year (if that were true, there would be no birds - at all) to feral cats giving people rabies or even plague (also not true).

The truth is, feral (aka community) cats are an important part of our ecosystem. They minimize rodent problems, they fill the gap that humans created after hunting other animals (like the bobcat) that they deemed a threat. A properly managed colony can stabilize the influx of stray cats into a neighborhood and help minimize problems with rodents.

National Feral Cat Day is observed on October 16 every year and we’re proud to take part in this annual tradition.

Read more: 5 Reasons Feral Cat Day Shouldn’t Freak You Out

How much water does your cat need?

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Water is the one thing that no living being can do without. It’s especially important to our pets. Not drinking enough water can result in lots of health problems for our dogs and cats.

This is why we’re helping PetSafe® celebrate National Pet Hydration Month this July. They not only understand the importance of water, they help make it safe for our pets. As you know if you read PetsWeekly, Drinkwells is our preferred way to make desert water a little more appealing to our pets. Since we’ve used pet fountains in our home, we have virtually eliminated urinary stones and crystals in our cats, and UTIs in our dogs.

“Our pets need one ounce of water per pound of bodyweight each day,” said Willie Wallace, CEO of Radio Systems Corporation, makers of the PetSafe brand. “Proper hydration plays a big role in a pet’s health, and can save pet parents a trip to their vet’s office.”

Read more: How much water does your cat need?

The Many Benefits of Cat Grasses

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Benefits of cat grassDespite being obligate carnivores, cats still require greens to stay healthy.

Summer is upon us and that makes the perfect time to grow some grass for your finicky feline. Whether you grow organic oatgrass, wheatgrass, catnip or any other type of cat-centric plant - your cats are sure to appreciate the effort!

Theories on why cats enjoy munching down on fresh grasses vary. Some experts consider cats’ grazing to be a behavioral trait, while others believe it to be an instinctual response and consider it an important part of their cats diets. But most believe it’s their way of increasing their intake of vitamins and minerals, as well as fiber, to help get all that hair they groomed from themselves moving out of their digestive tract.

(Grass eating usually equates to more hairballs, so here are 10 Creative Uses for Hair and Hairballs!)

Whatever the reason for making grasses available to cats, there is no denying that most enjoy some fresh grass. (Failure to provide it means your houseplants are likely to fall victim!)

Read more: The Many Benefits of Cat Grasses

Tabby Cats and Their Patterns

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Tabbies are a big part of our lives.

If you follow us on Instagram, you probably know that we have three beautiful full-time tabbies: CassieKyra The Cog and Alexandra. We also have one vocal foster cat we call Kreature. Each of these cats is magnificent and it's about time someone came up with a holiday celebrating their beauty.

And so, in Celebration of #NationalTabbyDay, we're talking about a few fun facts you may not know...

To begin, a tabby is not a breed of cat, but a general way of referring to a coat pattern. In fact,  usually “tabby” means stripes, swirls or spots on a cat that is orange, brown, white or grey colored cat.  In fact, the word tabby is often used as a generic term for "cat" (just like "hound" is often used as a general term for dogs). Tabby cats are found in a variety of different breeds.

Let’s take a look at the four basic types of tabby coat patterns.

Read more: Tabby Cats and Their Patterns

Feline Behavior

  • Is Mint Safe for Cats?

    Hello Grey Socks, Every time I put toothpaste on my brush, which is mint flavored, my cat wants to lick it. She goes completely banana's over it. Is it okay to let her lick some? Thanks,
    Kathy Easley

    Read More +
  • Wool-sucking in cats

    Dear Kyra, I have an adopted 5-month-old ginger boy named Barney. He's a very sweet, funny kitty, and I love him to pieces. But...he has some strange quirks. The nice people at the animal shelter told me that he was… Read More +

  • Cats covering feces

    Dear Ghost, Why do cats cover their feces? My two cats are neurotic about covering up everything in their litter box, which is stupid because it's automatic anyway. Is it really necessary? Thanks,
    Kristin

    Read More +
  • Cats spraying

    Baby, I live with 2 male cats (neutered) and 1 female cat (spayed). All of a sudden they have started spraying (they are 1 year old). They have sprayed my bed, my doors and in my closet (that I know of). I'm… Read More +

  • hypersthesia

    Mama-San, My 1 yr old tabby has developed a fear of its tail! The end twitches and she sometimes lightly attacks it, but most times just runs from it (especially at night) your site mentions anger in connection with tip- twitching.… Read More +

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